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‘Exhibition’ archive

Olafur Eliasson does it again and again and again and again…

Tuesday, September 2nd, 2014

Ever since I stepped into The Weather Project at the Tate Modern all those years ago I’ve been in love with Olafur Eliasson’s work which has just been catalogued and unleashed onto the t’internet via his shiny new website.

The Model Room
Olafur Eliasson – The Model Room 2003

Eliasson is probably best known for his large-scale installation pieces that invite the viewer to wonder through and experience the work as their own pace. Eliasson new website is an extension of this approach, I spent pretty much my whole lunch break having a wonder around and didn’t even begin to scratch the surface. So please do your eyes a favour and check it out.

The River Bed
Olafur Eliasson – The River Bed 2014

While in Copenhagen the other weekend I was lucky enough to go and visit probably the most beautiful art gallery I’ve ever been too, The Louisiana Museum which also just so happens to be featuring a major Eliasson exhibition with a brand new installation piece – The River Bed.

The piece is so simple, graphic and peaceful. It makes you feel 6 years old all over again as you wonder through a series of interconnecting rooms that resemble the end scenes of Kubricks 2001 crossed with the Apollo moon landings. Each room connects via Alice in Wonderland break in the walls that allow the river to flow downstream as you go to discover what’s upstream.

Copenhagen has a lot to offer but getting to experience this new piece from Eliasson was a personal highlight.

The exhibition runs until 4th of January 2015 so if your in Copenhagen anytime soon definitely go and visit it.

Martin Creed – What’s the point of it?

Tuesday, February 4th, 2014

Martin Creed at Hayward Gallery, London.  Photo by Linda Nylind. 26/1/2014.

So I went to see Martin Creed’s exhibition at the Hayward Gallery titled ‘What’s the point of it?’ at the weekend.

From the moment you step into the exhibition you’re confronted with a playground of whimsical art that is smart, funny and at it’s best made me grin like an idiot. The exhibition has it’s obvious highlights like Creed’s Mothers Spindle above or the highly entertaining ‘Work No 200, Balloon Room’, but throughout the exhibition there are some really great simplistic touches that catch and ensnare the minds eye in equal measure.

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I particularly liked the huge striped wall using different graphic adhesive tapes, shown above, but then again I would wouldn’t I. So do you eyes & mind a favour and pop along if you have a spare hour or two.

Enjoy!

A taste of the future

Thursday, October 17th, 2013

Here is a great little piece by Mark Hudson talking about his commission from the Design Museum in London for a visual timeline at the entrance to their ‘The Future Is Here’ show.

We love a nice bit Lasercut perspex, currently working on something ask we speak, and Marks graphic silhouettes work a treat in introducing visitors to ideas of manufacture and technological change across time.

‘The Future is Here’ exhibition runs until the 29th October at the Design Museum London and is well worth checking out.

Thanks for the heads up Mark.

Enjoy!

Kraftwerk – Man Machine

Tuesday, February 12th, 2013

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In honour of Kraftwerk we decided to write this blog post in German (a language I happen to speak quite well). Here we go:

Einen passenderen Schauplatz hätte Kraftwerk sich sicherlich nicht aussuchen können als das Tate Modern, ein zu einer Kunstgalerie ausgebautes altes Kraftwerk. Als wir in der ‘Turbine Hall’ ankamen saßen bereits zahlreiche Menschen friedlich auf einem der Kissen die am Eingang verteilt wurden. Wir waren uns zunächst nicht sicher, ob wir auf den Kissen sitzen bleiben müssten, aber schon bevor der erste Ton ausgeklungen war, standen die rund 1.200 Menschen bereits.

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In der vierten von acht Retrospektiven war Kraftwerks meist zelebrierte Album ‘Man Machine’ an der Reihe. Eröffnet wurde mit dem letzten Titel des Albums ‘The Man Machine’ gefolgt von Spacelab bevor es mit dem bekanntesten Lied des Albums und dem größten Hit, den Ralf Hütter in England verbuchen durfte, ‘The Model’ weiterging. Nach dem alle Lieder des Album gespielt waren folgte ein best-off. Kraftwerks größten Hits unter anderem Autobahn und Tour de France wurden zum besten gegeben. Begleitet wurde jedes Lied von 3D Projektionen, die neben der Musik großer Bestanteil des Gesamtauftrittes waren. Von einfachen geometrischen Formen, über an Matrix erinnernde grüne Raster, bis hin zu einer Autobahn fahrt in einem alten VW war alles dabei. Was alle 3D Projektionen gemein hatten war eine Einfachheit, die verglichen mit anderen 3D Medien die man heutzutage gewöhnt ist wirklich hervorstach.

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Das Tate war wirklich der perfekte Ort für solch einen Auftritt, der mühelos einen Bogen zwischen Musik und Kunst spannte. Zeitweise war das Publikum sehr still, aber nicht weil ihnen nicht gefiel was sie sahen, sondern aus großer Bewunderung und der Erkenntnis heraus, dass sie Zeugen eines phänomenal Auftrittes waren, an den sie sich lange Zeit erinnern werden.

Translation to follow shortly. In the meantime why not give google translate a go (not that it’ll make much sense).

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Tim Walker: Story Teller

Monday, December 3rd, 2012

Somerset House is currently home to ‘Story Teller’, an exhibition focusing on the wonderful work of fashion photographer Tim Walker. I went at the weekend and loved it. We used some of his images for mood boards in the past. He really is a very talented and inspirational photographer.

Beside his photography on show there is a selection of his large props he used for his imagery including a giant doll, large insects playing instruments, and an almost life-size replica of a Spitfire fighter plane. It’s great being able to see the fantastical props alongside the final images.

The exhibition is beautifully put together and his photography amazing . Tim Walker Story Teller, runs from 18 October – 27 January 2013, daily 10am – 6pm, free admission, at Somerset House, London.

Tim Walker (born in England, 1970) is a British fashion photographer.

Tim Walker’s photographs have entranced the readers of Vogue, month by month, for over a decade. Extravagant staging and romantic motifs characterise his unmistakable style. After concentrating on the photographic still for 15 years, Walker is now also making moving film.
On graduation in 1994, Walker worked as a freelance photography assistant in London before moving to New York City as a full time assistant to Richard Avedon. On returning to England, he initially concentrated on portrait and documentary work for UK newspapers. At the age of 25, he shot his first fashion story for Vogue and has continued to work to much acclaim ever since.
The Victoria and Albert Museum and the National Portrait Gallery in London include the photographs of Tim Walker in their permanent collections.

Tuesday, June 19th, 2012

Thursday sees the launch of DF intern Craig’s London degree show WHITESPACE. Having graduated from Bucks myself it’s always great to go back to check out the work of the bright young talent Bucks has to offer. If you’re looking for new interns or juniors for your studio or just want to have a nosey you should definitely check out WHITESPACE. The show will be held at the Candid Gallery which is located directly behind the Angel tube station.

Craig, it was a pleasure having you around! All of us here at DF wish you all the best for your show and of course your future career.

Rinse Presents: A Visual Feast

Friday, August 12th, 2011

Record covers are the main reason I became a designer and from a very early age that is what I wanted to do when I grew up, that and be an ambulance driver, but I’m going off point! I got very lucky and my first job straight out of uni was doing just that and I loved every minute of it.

Last night I was lucky enough to be invited the opening night of Rinse Presents: A Visual Retrospective, which in my opinion should have been called “A Visual Feast”, but I guess that would have been seen as boasting. I know from first hand how difficult it is to create within that 12×12 square format and what I gazed upon last night is a real testament to 17 years of lovingly grafted photography, art direction and design driven by a healthy musical obsession.

On show are some of the graphical highlights from DF chum Stuart Hammersley otherwise known as Give Up Art and I think you’ll agree it’s an impressive collection, one well worth popping along to see.

Also on shown is the equally impressive photography of one Shaun Bloodworth below, vastly underrated in my opinion, and together with Give Up Art their work has formed the foundation for a unique documentation of youth and music culture, with projects across both the UK and US, much of which will be shown alongside this Rinse FM exhibition.

The exhibition also falls on the 10th anniversary of London’s world famous, Rinse-afflilated, FWD>> club night, which is held on 20th August at a secret East London location.

The exhibition will be at the Truman Brewery Gallery – shop 14, Hanbury Street for 10 days from 12th to 21st of August, so if you do one thing this weekend get yourself down there and give your eyes a treat.

Ron Arad’s Curtain Call

Thursday, August 11th, 2011

Last night DF popped down to the Roundhouse to see Ron Arad’s Curtain Call. As part of Bloomberg Summer at the Roundhouse, internationally renowned artist, architect and designer, Ron Arad has invited his favourite artists, musicians and friends to create unique work for his 360° interactive installation.

Curtain Call is an installation in which a curtain of white silicon rods, eight metres high and hanging from above, encloses the great circular centre of the building. The rods collectively form a 360° screen on to which are projected animations and films by some of Arad’s creative friends. Christian Marclay will ring the circle with piano keys, running vertically, played by giant projected hands. Mat Collishaw will show a gorgeous tropical landscape which is nonetheless “poisoned by diseased and malicious-looking flowers”. Ori Gersht will show crowds at a bullfight, putting viewers in the middle of the circle in the position of a matador, or a bull.

We were lucky enough to be invited to a stand alone event, which featured our friend Jude Greenaway’s work, which he did in collaboration with his brother and Ron Arad for the Curtain Call. This is what Jude had to say about his work: “Our response to Arad’s installation poses the silicon surface as a refracted mirror. Filmed and animated content has been specifically designed to match the curtain and its surroundings, literally reflecting the Roundhouse back onto itself. Utilizing the buildings former primary function of rotation the work and its environment are intertwined and juxtaposed producing interesting hybrid creations between architecture and moving sculpture, bringing the building to life. Set to a bespoke theatrical score the viewer is immersed into a seamless 360° audio visual experience.

We were well impressed with Jude’s work, and you should definitely get yourself down to the Roundhouse to check out the Curtain Call.

Saul Bass: A Life in Film & Design

Thursday, August 4th, 2011

I’m super excited at the news that Laurence King will be publishing a new book Saul Bass: A Life in Film & Design, definitely a book for the DF reference library. For those not so familiar with Saul Bass’ work the biog on the Laurence King website briefly summarises the great mans achievements…

“This is the first book to be published on one of the greatest American designers of the 20th century, who was as famous for his work in film as for his corporate identity and graphic work. Saul Bass (1920-1996) created some of the most compelling images of American postwar visual culture. Having extended the remit of graphic design to include film titles, he went on to transform the genre. His best-known works include a series of unforgettable posters and title sequences for films such as Alfred Hitchcock’s Vertigo and Otto Preminger’s The Man with the Golden Arm and Anatomy of a Murder. He also created some of the most famous logos and corporate identity campaigns of the century, including those for major companies such as AT&T, Quaker Oats, United Airlines and Minolta.

His wife and collaborator, Elaine, joined the Bass office in the late 1950s. Together they created an impressive series of award-winning short films, including the Oscar-winning Why Man Creates, as well as an equally impressive series of film titles, ranging from Stanley Kubrick’s Spartacus in the early 1960s to Martin Scorsese’s Cape Fear and Casino in the 1990s.

Designed by Saul Bass’s daughter Jennifer and written by distinguished design historian Pat Kirkham, who knew Saul Bass, this book contains more than 1,400 illustrations, many from the Bass archive and never published before, providing an in-depth account of one of the leading graphic artists of the 20th century.”

As a footnote – one of the best exhibitions I ever had the fortune to see was the Saul Bass exhibition at the Design Museum back in 2004 which really blew me away. If I had to pull out a single piece of work by Mr Bass I’d have to go for the Magnificent Seven Poster above, the western remake of the 1954 classic Seven Samurai, beautifully simple in my opinion. Here’s a link to some of the goodies that where on show back in 2004 and while you’re there check out the rest of the graphical goodies on insect54’s flickr stream.

Enjoy.

An evening with Wim Crouwel

Friday, June 24th, 2011

Last night DF were lucky enough to pop down to London’s Southbank to hear from the great man himself, Wim Crouwel, speaking about his life, work and process. The talk, part of an on going exhibition at London’s Design Museum, was throughly interesting and very entertaining from a design/typographic master we have loved and admired for many, many years. Hopefully a video of the talk should be appearing online at the Premsela website sometime soon.

Finally if you haven’t popped down to see the Wim Crouwel exhibition, you’ve still got time as it’s on until the 3rd July. So Do it, Do it!